Sailing Instructions

  1. The first heat will start at the time indicated during the briefing.
  2. The red and green flags when raised together indicate we will start in 10 minutes.  We will not wait for any sailor who is out sailing or who is not ready.
  3. The competition will aim to be double elimination if conditions allow and competitor numbers are sufficient. Heats will be “man on man” with two heats on at the same time. That is four sailors on the water at any time. For divisions with small numbers of competitors  (<6), the competition will be a single elimination.
  4. Well before the start of the heat the four sailors should present themselves to the beach marshal in the marshaling area and collect their streamer.
  5. Any competitor who sails in the competition area during a heat (not his own) will be disqualified.
  6. Heats will be a minimum of 10minutes long but may be varied depending on the conditions. Riders will be notified at the briefing on the day.
  7. There shall be no break between heats unless otherwise notified.
  8. There shall be 6 judges with 3 judging each pair of sailors.
  9. Sailors shall have streamers attached (YELLOW high (mast head) and low (boom end) and BLUE high (mast head) and low (boom end).
  10. The two BLUE streamers are competing against each other, as are the two YELLOW streamers.
  11. The heat starts with all four sailors on the inside of the break.  Any sailor who starts his heat out the back will not be scored until they come in, turn and head out-can we change this? It’s a stupid rule.
  12. A flagpole will be used to signal the heats.
    1. RED flag means the heat is finished. As soon as the red flag goes up there are 2 minutes until the next heat.
    2. YELLOW flag goes up 1 minute before the start of the heat.
    3. GREEN flag means the heat is running.  If a wave is being ridden when the red flag is raised the whole wave ride will be scored.
    4. NO FLAG means 1 minute left to the end of the heat.
    5. Should the RED flag be raised during a heat proceed IMMEDIATELY to the beach.
  13. We will sail off for 3rd and 4th as well as 1st and 2nd.
  14. We will not wait for sailors who are not ready for their heat.  It is sailors’ responsibility to know when their heat is on and to be ready on time.
  15. The number of waves and jumps counted will depend on conditions. Typically, for a spot like Coronation Beach we will be looking to score 2 jumps and 2 waves. This may vary and riders will be notified at briefing on the day.
  16. All wave rides and all jumps are recorded and then the best 2 (depending on conditions) of each are counted for the score.  We will only score two jumps from the same type.  For example, if someone does three forwards, only the best two will be counted.  If that’s all the jumps he did then he only scores two jumps.
  17. The wave score is multiplied by 5 and the jumps by 3 and then summed for the final score.
  18. Transitions are not scored separately. If executed onto or within the wave, they will be counted within the wave riding score.
  19. Jumps coming in over the back of a wave are scored as jumps.
  20. Jumps while riding on the wave face are scored as part of the wave ride.
  21. If the wind is very light we may exclude jumps but this would be decided prior to the start of the heat.
  22. Sailors going out have right of way over sailors coming in.
  23. The first sailor on the wave or swell has right of way on that wave.  If sailors catch a wave simultaneously, the upwind sailor has right of way on that wave.
  24. Sailors committing a right of way violation which disadvantages another sailor will be penalised by removal of the score awarded during the violation and removal of their highest wave riding score in that heat.  All sailors including those with right of way shall avoid collisions at all times.

Judging Guidelines

Jump Guidelines

Below are a broad generalisation of highest scored manoeuvres to lowest scored manoeuvres.  The scores next to them are just to give a guideline for judges and a not a rule.

  • A jump is marked higher for being higher, stalled, one handed and landed well.
  • A jump is scored lower for being low, messy, out of control and crashed landings.
  • A very high jump will not be marked down much if the landing is wet as long as the sailor is in a water start position.
  • As a general rule, the judges want to see what you can do, not what you are learning to do.
  • New manoeuvres are encouraged, but only if executed in a controlled fashion.
  • All jumps will be classed in one of these 4 categories.
    • F – Forward rotating jump
    • C – Combined jump (Table/forward, Double)
    • B – Backward rotating jump
    • J – Normal jump
  • Maximum of 2 jumps will be scored from any one category. (This encourages a variety of manoeuvres and eliminates the need to mark down repeated moves.)
  Low   High 
1.
DOUBLE FORWARD LOOPS
6
7
8
9
10
11
2.
TABLE TOP FORWARDS
5
6
7
8
9
10
3.
PUSH LOOPS
4
5
6
7
8
9
4.
CLEW FIRST LOOPS
4
5
6
7
8
9
5.
BACK LOOPS
4
5
6
7
8
9
6.
STALLED FORWARD LOOP
3
4
5
6
7
8
7.
TABLE TOPS
2
3
4
5
6
7
8.
FORWARD LOOPS
2
3
4
5
6
7
9.
CHEESE ROLLS
2
3
4
5
6
7
10.
SHOVE IT
2
3
4
5
6
7
11.
HIGH JUMPS
1
2
3
4
5
6
12.
LONG JUMPS
0
1
2
3
4
5

Wave Riding Guidelines

Sailors are judged on the fundamental principles of wave riding – speed, fluidity and your proximity to the critical section i.e. ride in the critical section and combine a selection of backside and front side riding with “off the lip style manoeuvres”.  Points are awarded firstly for the wave selection and the quality and length of the ride and secondly for the manoeuvres pulled off during the ride.

Listed below is a generalisation of the highest scoring to lowest scoring manoeuvres pulled off on a wave.  To score well all of these should be executed or landed on the wave.

  • Off the Lip back loops;
  • Off the lip 360;
  • Off the lip forward loops;
  • Takas;
  • Goiters;
  • Table top aerials;
  • Off the lip aerials;
  • Forward loop in chop;
  • Body drags;
  • Chop hops;

Wave Riding Notes

  • Transitions will only score if executed either on to or off the wave.
  • If it is difficult to determine individual waves then the entire sail in (from outside to inside transition) will count as one wave score.
  • If a sailor is on a wave at the end of the heat, this wave will be scored until the sailor exits the wave.
  • Sailors who sail down the line looking for the spot to do one “big move” will not be scored as highly as someone riding the wave.
  • To gain maximum points sailors should demonstrate as wide a variety of different skills as possible.
  • Wave scores shall be determined by wave selection, placement within the wave (i.e how close or far the rider is from the critical section), manoeuvres, and style.
  • To encourage progress in wave sailing, new manoeuvres will be scored highly but only if executed in a controlled fashion.